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Education (K-12)

 

Building Effective Youth Councils

The Forum believes that meaningful youth engagement is critical for the creation of sustainable, widespread, high-impact change in the systems and settings that can either support or hinder young people’s progress.

Tuesday, July 31, 2007
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This publication, created by the Forum for Youth Investment with National League of Cities, provides a practical guide to engaging youth in policymaking. It provides a rationale for youth councils, keys to making them effective and examples of useful documents and language.

New York State Office of Children and Family Services Effective and Promising Practices

Once communities have determined their desired outcomes, this website offers information regarding federal agencies or nationally recognized organizations that use different levels of criteria for identifying effective programs. This website may assist in identifying effective programs that may best match your needs.

http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/sppd/eff_practices/links.asp

Friday, January 4, 2008
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This website is a one-stop resource on interventions that are considered to be effective and promising.
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Getting to Outcomes: 10 Steps for Achieving Results-Based Accountability

GTO consists of 10 steps that empower program developers to do the following:

Wednesday, August 1, 2007
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Developed by the RAND Corporation, Getting to Outcomes outlines a step-by-step process to plan, implement and evaluate effective programs that are intended to achieve outcomes in a community. Developed for the substance abuse prevention field, Getting to Outcomes can be applied to the process of goal-setting and intervention selection for many social issues. This report briefly describes GTO's 10 Steps.

Developing and Sharing Juvenile Justice Data in New York State

As in many other states, New York’s juvenile justice system is run by several agencies that each collect and report their own data. Until recently, this data had never been compiled or distributed to offer a comprehensive understanding of the system. This project sought to empower state agencies to report data back to counties in a systematic way that could improve local planning. The Vera Project staff are currently working with county officials from across New York to help them use these and future reports to shape juvenile justice policies and practices.

Thursday, September 1, 2005
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In 2005, the Vera Institute of Justice collaborated with New York State to develop the state's first ever set of juvenile justice indicators- statistics that provide insight into an organization's work or the environment in which it operates. Providing a comprehensive view of juvenile justice, the project is a good example for other states looking to align their data.
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Community Data Inventory Worksheet and Example

The worksheet was developed based on work with the Southeast Challenge Cities, as they identified the need to align their data amongst their stakeholders. The example is provided to aid leaders in completing their own community data assessment.

Thursday, February 3, 2011
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This worksheet and accompanying example help leaders get a fuller picture of how data are shared and disseminated in your community. It helps leaders assess how well they are collecting, warehousing and sharing data about youth outcomes, community, school and family supports, and leader efforts.

Gallup Student Poll

The Gallup Student Poll

Friday, May 15, 2009
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Gallup has harnessed years of research and development, and distilled three key indicators of student success into a single metric. The free poll measures student hope for the future, engagement with school, and wellbeing - factors that have been shown to drive students' grades, achievement scores, retention, and future employment.
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Program Quality Pyramid

In order to create conditions for youth motivation, needs for safety, belonging, and esteem must be met. High quality scores indicate that things are in place for youth to have access to key developmental experiences and to get their needs met. When youth needs are met they are likely to be motivated to engage in the program.

Saturday, April 14, 2007
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Quality in after school programming is defined by this pyramid. The pyramid is all about youth motivation to engage in the program. It reflects Maslow’s hierarchy, which suggests that we all naturally seek to learn and grow but that we have needs that get in the way.

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