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Education (K-12)

 

Education Strategies: Improving Success for Children and Youth

 

Focus Areas:

 

  • Enter school ready to succeed
  • Read proficiently by 4th grade
  • Make a successful transition to middle school
  • Graduate from high school on time
  • Be ready for success in college, work, and life

United Way Worldwide Education Website

Saturday, April 23, 2011
Short Description: 
Education is the cornerstone of individual and community success. But with more than 1.2 million children dropping out each year, America faces an education crisis. The cost? More than $312 billion in lost wages, taxes and productivity over their lifetimes. These trends are reversible, but only when communities and public, private and nonprofit sectors work together. United Way Worldwide is dedicated to improving education outcomes for all children and youth, and this website lays out their priority areas, resources and case studies.

College Completion Agenda State Policy Guide

Each of the commission’s recommendations is the focus of a chapter in the State Policy Guide. The ten recommendations are:
 

Monday, June 28, 2010
Short Description: 
The College Board and the National Conference of State Legislatures joined together to produce a practical policy guide for state legislators to pursue each of the Commission on Access, Admissions and Success in Higher Education's recommendations. The guide acts as a road map toward increasing the number of Americans who attain a postsecondary degree and empowering legislators to be an even more positive and active force in education reform.

Impact of Youth Development Programs On Student Academic Achievement

School districts and municipalities throughout the U.S. are under intense pressure to reform schools, raise graduation rates, and better prepare American youth for a workforce that must compete globally. Improving America’s educational system so that all students have access to a quality education is important but focusing on that system alone will not ensure the educational success of our nation’s young people.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Short Description: 
This brief cites the importance of a full-range of developmental assets, in school, in the home and in the community, that youth need to succeed. It indicates that “meaningful progress in improving educational outcomes must involve multiple stakeholders and a variety of sustained efforts over time.”

Parent Engagement Toolkit

Three priorities that are clearly critical to student success throughout a child’s academic career are:

  • Attendance Every Day : Ensure children go to school regularly
  • Achievement Every Year :  Monitor and help children make satisfactory progress each year
  • Attainment Over Time : Set high expectations for children and plan for attaining their long-term goals

Each one is heavily influenced by the actions and thinking of parents as well as educators, community-based providers and students themselves.

Wednesday, June 23, 2010
Short Description: 
Parents and caregivers are arguably the most important stakeholders in a child’s educational success. With nearly 1.3 million students dropping out of high school each year, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and America’s Promise Alliance developed this toolkit to engage parents in dropout prevention and development strategies to ensure the success of all children. This toolkit is a resource for Dropout Summit conveners and community leaders bringing the parent voice into the planning process and the development of local and state action plans addressing the dropout crisis.

5 Ways To Build a Culture of Collaboration with Staff, Teachers and Parents

By Sharon D. Kruse

Kruse is the author of the AASA book Building Strong School Cultures: A Leader’s Guide to Change, published by Corwin Press.

The following tips can help you build a culture of collaboration in your school.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011
Short Description: 
Creating a school culture that ensures positive outcomes for all students requires an “all hands on deck” approach to meeting the needs of the school community. Yet, bringing staff, teachers and parents together to do the work of the school is not easy. Collaboration cannot be coerced nor compelled. Rather, school leaders must help all members of the school community feel a sense of pride and ownership in their work.
Partner: 

6 Tips for Leading with Data for School Improvement


By Ellen Goldring and Mark Berends

Goldring and Berends are authors of the AASA book Leading with Data: A Path to School Improvement, published by Corwin Press.

The anchor for school improvement efforts is a schoolwide focus on teaching and learning. Toward that end, successful school leaders attend to school effectiveness indicators that are rooted in leading with data, including:

Saturday, October 23, 2010
Short Description: 
Today’s effective educational leaders use data extensively to guide them in making decisions, setting and prioritizing goals, and monitoring progress. They also use data to define needs, plan interventions and evaluate progress. This short paper outlines key considerations to think through to ensure the best use of data for effective leadership.
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Educating the Total Child Campaign Resources

Through the Educating the Total Child advocacy campaign, AASA members are committed to creating the conditions necessary for all students to become successful, lifelong learners. The campaign addresses three key factors that determine children’s academic achievement:

Sunday, January 23, 2011
Short Description: 
AASA believes it’s time to get back to the basics of supporting the total child — from physical and mental health to the development of fundamental, lifelong learning skills. Only when children have support for all their needs will schools have a real chance of helping every student master required education concepts and skills.
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Are They Really Ready to Work?

If excellence is necessary for America to continue to effectively compete in the global economy, then there is much work to be done in preparing the next generation of professionals to enter the workplace.

Sunday, April 22, 2007
Short Description: 
Given the urgent need to find skilled professionals, The Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, The Partnership for 21st Century Skills, and the Society for Human Resource Management conducted a survey, "Are They Really Ready to Work? Employers’ Perspectives on the Basic Knowledge and Applied Skills of New Entrants to the 21st Century U.S. Workforce", to gain a better understanding of the readiness of new entrants to the workforce.

Tomorrow’s Workforce: Ready or Not – It’s a Choice the Business Community Must Make Now

Friday, May 23, 2008
Short Description: 
This report, prepared by Corporate Voices for Working Families, spotlights the challenges facing the business community—and highlights actions that can be taken now to help solve a problem that involves not just young people, but one that touches the lives of everyone.

Why America Needs High-Quality Early Care and Education

Thursday, May 14, 2009
Short Description: 
Over the past three decades, business leaders have invested time, expertise and resources in efforts to improve K–12 education in the United States. What Corporate Voices for Working Families and the Business Roundtable have learned leads to the conclusion that America’s continuing efforts to improve education and develop a world-class workforce will be hampered without serious federal and state commitments to high-quality early care and education for all children, zero through five. In challenging economic times, it is essential that public investment be as efficient and effective as possible. Investments in quality early care and education, with a particular focus on children most at risk, are a wise and safe investment in our nation’s success.
Age Group: 

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