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Overarching Leadership Body Structural Assessment Chart

Six components have been shown to influence the success of a children's cabinet or council: scope, authority, home, scale, resources and local connections. Although no combination is deemed 'correct,' it is important to consider the best choice for each component when developing or restructuring a cabinet or council.

Wednesday, August 1, 2012
Short Description: 
This chart helps assess an overarching youth issues leadership body, such as a children's cabinet, based on six components of success: scope, authority, home, scale, resources and local connections. Taken from the State Children's Cabinet and Councils Series Elements of Success: Structural Options.
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State Children's Cabinets and Councils Series - Elements of Success: Structural Options

Children's cabinets and councils have the potential to systematically coordinate the fragmented funding and services that often occur at the state level. Children's cabinets are typically made up of heads of government agencies with child and youth serving programs, who meet on a regular basis with the collective goal of coordinating services, developing a common set of outcomes and collaboratively deciding upon and implementing plans to foster the well-being of young people.

Friday, August 1, 2008
Short Description: 
Part of the State Children's Cabinets and Councils Series, this issue brief reviews the range of existing state children's cabinet and council structures and offers tips for getting the most effective structure in place.
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Building Effective Youth Councils: A Practical Guide to Engaging Youth in Policy Making

The guide is divided into three parts:


The Rationale for Youth Engagement in Government provides a theoretical and historical context for youth councils by articulating the rationale for engaging youth in policy and decision-making processes and by explaining the Forum’s Principles of Youth Engagement.

Sunday, July 15, 2007
Short Description: 
The guide is designed to help states and localities create or strengthen their own youth councils. It is a synthesis of theory and practice that provides a general framework for thinking about youth councils, explaining the principles for youth action and the importance of youth engagement. It also incorporates advice and lessons from people in the field who have started or currently staff youth councils across the country. The guide incorporates examples from these youth councils to illustrate key points, focusing heavily on the youth councils in Boston, Massachusetts; Hampton, Virginia; and the state of New Mexico.

Education Strategies: Improving Success for Children and Youth

 

Focus Areas:

 

  • Enter school ready to succeed
  • Read proficiently by 4th grade
  • Make a successful transition to middle school
  • Graduate from high school on time
  • Be ready for success in college, work, and life

United Way Worldwide Education Website

Saturday, April 23, 2011
Short Description: 
Education is the cornerstone of individual and community success. But with more than 1.2 million children dropping out each year, America faces an education crisis. The cost? More than $312 billion in lost wages, taxes and productivity over their lifetimes. These trends are reversible, but only when communities and public, private and nonprofit sectors work together. United Way Worldwide is dedicated to improving education outcomes for all children and youth, and this website lays out their priority areas, resources and case studies.

College Completion Agenda State Policy Guide

Each of the commission’s recommendations is the focus of a chapter in the State Policy Guide. The ten recommendations are:
 

Monday, June 28, 2010
Short Description: 
The College Board and the National Conference of State Legislatures joined together to produce a practical policy guide for state legislators to pursue each of the Commission on Access, Admissions and Success in Higher Education's recommendations. The guide acts as a road map toward increasing the number of Americans who attain a postsecondary degree and empowering legislators to be an even more positive and active force in education reform.

Improving College Completion - Gathering Information: Tips for Legislators

Ask Great Questions
     

  • How many adults in the state have a postsecondary credential or degree?
  • How many students are placed into remedial courses and how do they perform in those courses? How many remedial students complete a degree?
  • How successful are students in first-year, introductory courses (also known as gateway courses)?
  • Do institutions in the state administer exit surveys to track the reasons students drop out? If so, what are the main reasons?
Wednesday, September 15, 2010
Short Description: 
State legislators are in a prime position to help increase college completion. They have the power to enact effective policies that can increase the number of students who earn a certificate or degree. Before developing policies, however, legislators will want to know exactly what the problems are in their state. This guide provides some tips for gathering essential information and data related to college completion.
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An Invitation to the Big Picture: Implementing a Local Collaboration for Youth (LCY) in Your Community

How are the children and youth in your community doing? What’s their high school graduation rate? How about the number of adolescent pregnancies, rate of childhood obesity and the level of juvenile crime? Are they ready by the age of 21 to go to college, get a job, be a parent?

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Short Description: 
The National Collaboration for Youth and the Forum for Youth Investment recently released a guide to forming and sustaining Local Collaborations for Youth (LCY). An LCY is a means for local child- and youth-serving agencies to pool their collective expertise, resources, and voice in ‘whole-community’ efforts to improve outcomes for children and youth. It’s a chance to take a look at the Big Picture of child and youth well-being in a community. It’s about identifying gaps, aligning efforts, and improving impact.

Recommendations for the Reauthorization of the ESEA

The following guiding principles were used to frame the analysis and recommendations offered:

Tuesday, September 28, 2010
Short Description: 
The National Collaboration for Youth brings together over 50 national non‐profit organizations that provide programs, services, technical assistance, training and evaluation to youth in America. Primarily community‐based, the members of NCY have a significant interest in youth development. Through that lens, National Collaboration for Youth examined No Child Left Behind and proposed recommendations for change during the upcoming reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.
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