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Community Data Inventory Worksheet and Example

The worksheet was developed based on work with the Southeast Challenge Cities, as they identified the need to align their data amongst their stakeholders. The example is provided to aid leaders in completing their own community data assessment.

Thursday, February 3, 2011
Short Description: 
This worksheet and accompanying example help leaders get a fuller picture of how data are shared and disseminated in your community. It helps leaders assess how well they are collecting, warehousing and sharing data about youth outcomes, community, school and family supports, and leader efforts.

Child Trends DataBank

The DataBank provides up-to-date information on a large range of indicators. It can be searched by life stages (pregnancy and birth, infants and young children, adolescents, and young adults), by well-being areas (health and safety, child care and education, and behaviors) or the context for children (demographics, family and community, and economic security).

www.childtrendsdatabank.org

Sunday, August 7, 2011
Short Description: 
The DataBank is a one-stop source for the latest national trends and research on over 100 key indicators of child and youth well-being. This information is provided by Child Trends, a national leader in the field for over 30 years.
Partner: 
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Program Landscape Mapping Packet

Program landscape mapping, comprised of data gathered through a survey or online database, can help your community get a picture of services, supports and opportunities that are available to children and youth in your community.

Thursday, May 15, 2014
Short Description: 
This resource packet is designed to help leaders better understand the services, supports and opportunities available to children and youth in a community. It includes a guide, a template for a program landscape mapping survey, and a set of sample charts and results.

Improving the Effectiveness of Juvenile Justice Programs

The paper presents a new approach to evidence-based practice that will produce better outcomes for youth involved in the juvenile justice system. The paper begins with an overview of the different approaches to evidence-based practice and introduces a tool Dr. Mark Lipsey has developed to better make use of the vast knowledge base. It then embeds this new approach within a comprehensive juvenile justice framework that will allow increased knowledge to benefit the entire juvenile justice continuum, rather than a handful programs serving a limited number of youth.

Thursday, December 16, 2010
Short Description: 
This publication provides a new perspective on evidence-based practice in the field of juvenile justice. As Shay Bilchik, director of the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and research professor at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, says about the focus of the paper, “It is not just about evaluating programs, but ensuring that there is a sufficient array of programs available, that youth are matched to appropriate services based on risk and need and that services are evaluated to determine if we are achieving the outcomes the science tells us we should be able to realize.”

Program Quality Pyramid

In order to create conditions for youth motivation, needs for safety, belonging, and esteem must be met. High quality scores indicate that things are in place for youth to have access to key developmental experiences and to get their needs met. When youth needs are met they are likely to be motivated to engage in the program.

Saturday, April 14, 2007
Short Description: 
Quality in after school programming is defined by this pyramid. The pyramid is all about youth motivation to engage in the program. It reflects Maslow’s hierarchy, which suggests that we all naturally seek to learn and grow but that we have needs that get in the way.

Building Effective Youth Councils: A Practical Guide to Engaging Youth in Policy Making

The guide is divided into three parts:


The Rationale for Youth Engagement in Government provides a theoretical and historical context for youth councils by articulating the rationale for engaging youth in policy and decision-making processes and by explaining the Forum’s Principles of Youth Engagement.

Sunday, July 15, 2007
Short Description: 
The guide is designed to help states and localities create or strengthen their own youth councils. It is a synthesis of theory and practice that provides a general framework for thinking about youth councils, explaining the principles for youth action and the importance of youth engagement. It also incorporates advice and lessons from people in the field who have started or currently staff youth councils across the country. The guide incorporates examples from these youth councils to illustrate key points, focusing heavily on the youth councils in Boston, Massachusetts; Hampton, Virginia; and the state of New Mexico.

Youth-Adult Partnerships in Public Action: Principles, Organizational Culture and Outcomes

The case studies described in this report underscore the critical role that community-based organizations can play both in developing young people’s leadership abilities and driving positive community change. Specifically, the authors push beyond principles, identifying effective organizational and management practices that can help any organization committed to meaningful youth engagement advance their efforts in concrete ways. Additionally, the outcomes they identify present a useful impact framework for much-needed future program evaluation and research efforts.

Thursday, November 6, 2008
Short Description: 
The Forum partnered with the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Nonprofits to publish Youth-Adult Partnerships in Public Action: Principles, Organizational Culture and Outcomes. This study focuses on how organizations translate principles of youth engagement into practice and build a culture of partnership, as well as the outcomes – for young people, institutions and communities – that can result when they do. The research focuses on two organizations, Austin Voices for Education and Youth and Oasis Community IMPACT in Nashville, TN, but the lessons can help any organization committed to meaningful youth engagement advance their efforts in concrete ways.
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Education Strategies: Improving Success for Children and Youth

 

Focus Areas:

 

  • Enter school ready to succeed
  • Read proficiently by 4th grade
  • Make a successful transition to middle school
  • Graduate from high school on time
  • Be ready for success in college, work, and life

United Way Worldwide Education Website

Saturday, April 23, 2011
Short Description: 
Education is the cornerstone of individual and community success. But with more than 1.2 million children dropping out each year, America faces an education crisis. The cost? More than $312 billion in lost wages, taxes and productivity over their lifetimes. These trends are reversible, but only when communities and public, private and nonprofit sectors work together. United Way Worldwide is dedicated to improving education outcomes for all children and youth, and this website lays out their priority areas, resources and case studies.

An Invitation to the Big Picture: Implementing a Local Collaboration for Youth (LCY) in Your Community

How are the children and youth in your community doing? What’s their high school graduation rate? How about the number of adolescent pregnancies, rate of childhood obesity and the level of juvenile crime? Are they ready by the age of 21 to go to college, get a job, be a parent?

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Short Description: 
The National Collaboration for Youth and the Forum for Youth Investment recently released a guide to forming and sustaining Local Collaborations for Youth (LCY). An LCY is a means for local child- and youth-serving agencies to pool their collective expertise, resources, and voice in ‘whole-community’ efforts to improve outcomes for children and youth. It’s a chance to take a look at the Big Picture of child and youth well-being in a community. It’s about identifying gaps, aligning efforts, and improving impact.

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