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Broader Partnerships

 

Opportunities in the Workforce Readiness Pipeline: A Community Engagement Toolkit for Business

The toolkit reflects the expertise of United Way Worldwide and the Workforce Strategy Center, content partners in the publication. It offers practical advice and hands-on steps to investing in community improvement, and features case studies from leading corporate citizens like KPMG LLP's Family for Literacy program, Baxter International's Science@Work program, and the Bridging Richmond initiative, supported by the Altria Group.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011
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This toolkit is designed to assist business and local leaders in developing successful, sustainable partnerships to ensure that more young people in their communities have the highest-quality education and supports they need to be successful today, and as the workforce we will depend on tomorrow.
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Broader Partnerships 101

After years of working with a wide variety of partnerships at the state and local level, the Forum for Youth Investment has concluded that communities and states need to consider a few basic components of partnerships. This webinar explained about this leadership capacity area and what you can do to build broader, more effective partnerships.

VIEW THE WEBINAR HERE.

Align and strengthen coalitions, commissions and intermediaries

When you get all of these groups working together harmoniously, you’ll bring everyone’s efforts closer to that concert we talked about earlier. The community will see an alignment of goals, strategies and functions among its leading organizations. Not every problem will be solved, but all of the community’s issues and populations will be covered by somebody.

Here are resources that address common questions:

There must be dozens of partnerships out there. How do I find them and figure out how they fit together?

Build an overarching leadership council

This is a task force, coalition or committee with a clear governance structure, responsibilities to engage public and private stakeholders, and members that hold each other accountable for carrying out their part of the big picture action plan. The council can be a new entity or an existing one. It can take many forms; only you know what’s best for your community or state.

You can, however, learn from those who have already done it.

Here are resources that address common questions:

What Makes an Action Plan a Ready by 21 Action Plan?

Sunday, October 31, 2010
Short Description: 
There are a myriad of planning approaches that “begin with the end in mind,” supporting the development of action agendas that are focused on improving outcomes. Ready by 21 provides important added dimensions to these approaches, helping address two common challenges – how can we address more than one issue or indicator at a time? And how can we maximize involvement in and commitment to both the planning process and the work that follows? This guide offers guidelines and recommendations.

Business Engagement Menu

Thursday, August 25, 2011
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Developed by Ready by 21 Partner Corporate Voices for Working Families, this is a menu of ways that business leaders can be involved in their communities. Nonprofit leaders can use this to see the array of options for businesses to be involved in changing the odds for children and youth.
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