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Broader Partnerships

 

Building Effective Youth Councils: A Practical Guide to Engaging Youth in Policy Making

The guide is divided into three parts:


The Rationale for Youth Engagement in Government provides a theoretical and historical context for youth councils by articulating the rationale for engaging youth in policy and decision-making processes and by explaining the Forum’s Principles of Youth Engagement.

Sunday, July 15, 2007
Short Description: 
The guide is designed to help states and localities create or strengthen their own youth councils. It is a synthesis of theory and practice that provides a general framework for thinking about youth councils, explaining the principles for youth action and the importance of youth engagement. It also incorporates advice and lessons from people in the field who have started or currently staff youth councils across the country. The guide incorporates examples from these youth councils to illustrate key points, focusing heavily on the youth councils in Boston, Massachusetts; Hampton, Virginia; and the state of New Mexico.

Youth-Adult Partnerships in Public Action: Principles, Organizational Culture and Outcomes

The case studies described in this report underscore the critical role that community-based organizations can play both in developing young people’s leadership abilities and driving positive community change. Specifically, the authors push beyond principles, identifying effective organizational and management practices that can help any organization committed to meaningful youth engagement advance their efforts in concrete ways. Additionally, the outcomes they identify present a useful impact framework for much-needed future program evaluation and research efforts.

Thursday, November 6, 2008
Short Description: 
The Forum partnered with the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Nonprofits to publish Youth-Adult Partnerships in Public Action: Principles, Organizational Culture and Outcomes. This study focuses on how organizations translate principles of youth engagement into practice and build a culture of partnership, as well as the outcomes – for young people, institutions and communities – that can result when they do. The research focuses on two organizations, Austin Voices for Education and Youth and Oasis Community IMPACT in Nashville, TN, but the lessons can help any organization committed to meaningful youth engagement advance their efforts in concrete ways.
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An Invitation to the Big Picture: Implementing a Local Collaboration for Youth (LCY) in Your Community

How are the children and youth in your community doing? What’s their high school graduation rate? How about the number of adolescent pregnancies, rate of childhood obesity and the level of juvenile crime? Are they ready by the age of 21 to go to college, get a job, be a parent?

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Short Description: 
The National Collaboration for Youth and the Forum for Youth Investment recently released a guide to forming and sustaining Local Collaborations for Youth (LCY). An LCY is a means for local child- and youth-serving agencies to pool their collective expertise, resources, and voice in ‘whole-community’ efforts to improve outcomes for children and youth. It’s a chance to take a look at the Big Picture of child and youth well-being in a community. It’s about identifying gaps, aligning efforts, and improving impact.

5 Ways To Build a Culture of Collaboration with Staff, Teachers and Parents

By Sharon D. Kruse

Kruse is the author of the AASA book Building Strong School Cultures: A Leader’s Guide to Change, published by Corwin Press.

The following tips can help you build a culture of collaboration in your school.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011
Short Description: 
Creating a school culture that ensures positive outcomes for all students requires an “all hands on deck” approach to meeting the needs of the school community. Yet, bringing staff, teachers and parents together to do the work of the school is not easy. Collaboration cannot be coerced nor compelled. Rather, school leaders must help all members of the school community feel a sense of pride and ownership in their work.
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Common Goals, Unique Strengths: Education and Business Partnerships

Collaboration between business and education can ensure that students graduate high school equipped with the skills necessary to thrive in the workplace, post-secondary education and life. In this publication, the American Association of School Administrators and Corporate Voices for Working Families highlight the benefit of these partnerships, tips for engaging educators and business leaders, and a case study illustrating these partnerships in action.

Tuesday, September 7, 2010
Short Description: 
Educators and business leaders must create meaningful, successful and long lasting partnerships to ensure that all youth are ready for college, work and life.

Ready by 21 Leadership Capacity Audit Sample Recommendations

Leadership capacity audits serve the same purpose as financial audits. They provide leaders with a structured opportunity to receive feedback on core functions that are critical to their mission so that they can increase their overall horsepower to make sustained change. The attached list of key findings and recommendations from a generic city will give you an idea of the helpful guidance this process can have.

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Friday, August 5, 2011
Short Description: 
Broader partnerships, bigger goals, better data, bolder actions to improve program quality, consistency and reach – these are the goals of leadership. To support this work, the Forum for Youth Investment has developed the leadership capacity audit: a set of structured surveys, interviews and processes designed to assess a community's overall leadership capacities. This process involves a series of stakeholder interviews and analysis of key indicators and data sources, and results in a set of findings and recommendations like this document.
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Ready by 21 Policy Alignment Series: Align New Policies with Existing Efforts to Collaborate

Over the years, policies requiring the creation of a new collaboration that focuses on a narrow topic have left many states and communities with dozens of separate, concurrent collaborations.  As one local leader put it: "I used to have to attend meetings with 17 different departments; now I have to participate in 17 different coalitions."  Georgia, for example, met a federal Head Start requirement regarding early childhood issues by modifying its existing children’s cabinet rather than creating a new collaborative.

Thursday, August 4, 2011
Short Description: 
This policy brief by the Forum for Youth Investment provides real world examples of what can go wrong when policy language does not encourage new efforts to blend with existing collaboratives. The brief also includes examples of language that does promote collaboration.

Don’t Stop Collaborating – Just Stop Creating New Collaboratives

Check out these tips for working collaboratively without creating redundancy. Learn how states and communities, from Petaluma, Calif. to Texas, are taking steps to align their collaboratives.

 

Thursday, August 4, 2011
Short Description: 
Many states and communities have multiple task forces, partnerships and councils working on overlapping youth issues, from bullying to pregnancy to dropouts. This policy brief calls attentions to the problem of collaboration overload, and suggests ways to tackle it.
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