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Resource Archive

 

Explore this collection of tools, reports, guides and other materials selected from across the expertise of the Ready by 21 National Partnership. You can search for specific resources using the filters on the left side or using the drop down menus below.

Worksheet
August 31, 2014
This worksheet is designed to help leaders assess current data strengths and gaps in their community. The worksheet prompts thinking about what data is important for decision making, where current data is accessed, and what additional data would contribute to more informed decision making.
Tutorial
August 26, 2014
Use this facilitator's guide and sample in a community meeting to help think about the variety of settings and supports that youth have access to and how the community's goals for young people fit into the bigger picture.
Tutorial
May 15, 2014
This resource packet is designed to help leaders better understand the services, supports and opportunities available to children and youth in a community. It includes a guide, a template for a program landscape mapping survey, and a set of sample charts and results.
Report
August 6, 2012
Through their work with the White House Council for Community Solutions, The Bridgespan Group had the opportunity to learn from 12 community collaboratives engaged in collective impact across the country. These collaboratives have already achieved needle-moving change (at least 10 percent progress on a community-wide metric) and are making further strides in solving critical social issues. Below are profiles of each that share the collaboratives' paths to getting results.
Webinar
January 30, 2012
To make good decisions, leaders need complete data from all the settings and systems where young people spend their time. They need information about youths’ physical and mental health, afterschool activities, employment and family structure, and more. Better data helps leaders use their resources more efficiently and effectively.
Tutorial
November 1, 2011
Youth voices are critical to decision making on issues such as school reform. This guide provides information on how youth panels can be a tool to meaningfully engage young people on an issue that directly affects them: improvements to their schools.
Brochure
August 5, 2011
The Southeast Cities Challenge is an initiative to develop core leadership capacities that are critical to efforts to improve child and youth outcomes from birth to young adulthood. The Ready by 21 National Partnership, a coalition of prominent national organizations whose members touch the lives of over 100 million children and youth across the country, created the Challenge as part of its current focus on working in the Southeast region of the U.S.
Report
August 5, 2011
Broader partnerships, bigger goals, better data, bolder actions to improve program quality, consistency and reach – these are the goals of leadership. To support this work, the Forum for Youth Investment has developed the leadership capacity audit: a set of structured surveys, interviews and processes designed to assess a community's overall leadership capacities. This process involves a series of stakeholder interviews and analysis of key indicators and data sources, and results in a set of findings and recommendations like this document.
Guide
June 23, 2011
The National Collaboration for Youth and the Forum for Youth Investment recently released a guide to forming and sustaining Local Collaborations for Youth (LCY). An LCY is a means for local child- and youth-serving agencies to pool their collective expertise, resources, and voice in ‘whole-community’ efforts to improve outcomes for children and youth. It’s a chance to take a look at the Big Picture of child and youth well-being in a community. It’s about identifying gaps, aligning efforts, and improving impact.
Brochure
June 14, 2011
The Credentialed by 26 Challenge (March-October, 2011) helps selected communities increase supports for older youth – with an emphasis on helping more low-income, minority and first-generation college-goers obtain postsecondary credentials with labor market value.