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Align and strengthen coalitions, commissions and intermediaries

 

Mapping Moving Trains Packet

The Mapping Moving Trains Packet consists of an activity guide, a worksheet and a sample dashboard excel spreadsheet. The activity guide can be used to guide a group exercise along with the worksheet. The excel spreadsheet is a template for making a visual to illustrate the results of the exercise. Use this tool to gather information about important collaboratives and networks and to share the data with your stakeholders.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Short Description: 
This packet of materials assists with learning more about the coalitions and networks that are working on child and youth issues. It provides an activity guide, worksheet and sample visual.

Dimensions of a Leadership Council

This chart outlines the questions that need to be asked when forming an overarching leadership council or when selecting an existing entity to serve in the function. The dimensions that need to be considered are goals, alignment, geography, staffing, connections and structures, functions and roles, authority/mandate and accountability.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013
Short Description: 
This chart outlines the important factors to consider when creating an overarching leadership body for youth issues. This chart can be used to assess a current leadership council or can help communities form a new one.

Building Effective Youth Councils: A Practical Guide to Engaging Youth in Policy Making

The guide is divided into three parts:


The Rationale for Youth Engagement in Government provides a theoretical and historical context for youth councils by articulating the rationale for engaging youth in policy and decision-making processes and by explaining the Forum’s Principles of Youth Engagement.

Sunday, July 15, 2007
Short Description: 
The guide is designed to help states and localities create or strengthen their own youth councils. It is a synthesis of theory and practice that provides a general framework for thinking about youth councils, explaining the principles for youth action and the importance of youth engagement. It also incorporates advice and lessons from people in the field who have started or currently staff youth councils across the country. The guide incorporates examples from these youth councils to illustrate key points, focusing heavily on the youth councils in Boston, Massachusetts; Hampton, Virginia; and the state of New Mexico.

An Invitation to the Big Picture: Implementing a Local Collaboration for Youth (LCY) in Your Community

How are the children and youth in your community doing? What’s their high school graduation rate? How about the number of adolescent pregnancies, rate of childhood obesity and the level of juvenile crime? Are they ready by the age of 21 to go to college, get a job, be a parent?

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Short Description: 
The National Collaboration for Youth and the Forum for Youth Investment recently released a guide to forming and sustaining Local Collaborations for Youth (LCY). An LCY is a means for local child- and youth-serving agencies to pool their collective expertise, resources, and voice in ‘whole-community’ efforts to improve outcomes for children and youth. It’s a chance to take a look at the Big Picture of child and youth well-being in a community. It’s about identifying gaps, aligning efforts, and improving impact.

Common Goals, Unique Strengths: Education and Business Partnerships

Collaboration between business and education can ensure that students graduate high school equipped with the skills necessary to thrive in the workplace, post-secondary education and life. In this publication, the American Association of School Administrators and Corporate Voices for Working Families highlight the benefit of these partnerships, tips for engaging educators and business leaders, and a case study illustrating these partnerships in action.

Tuesday, September 7, 2010
Short Description: 
Educators and business leaders must create meaningful, successful and long lasting partnerships to ensure that all youth are ready for college, work and life.

Massachusetts Success for Life Toolkit

Location

MA

SNEAK PEEK
Local Action Planning Team Worksheet

To view the entire guide, click the download now button above

Tuesday, February 1, 2011
Short Description: 
Lifelong success in the 21st century demands unprecedented cooperation and collaboration between and amongst all of those who care for and about children, youth and families. Success for Life offers a foundation for a shared mission to move Massachusetts forward. Using the Ready by 21 approach and facilitated by the Forum for Youth Investment, a cross-sector, cross-discipline, cross-agency team held a series of ground-breaking conversations to define and advance a shared set of goals and strategies capable of lifting all children, youth and families toward self-sufficiency and success for life. This guide features the tools and resources utilized for those conversations.
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Ready by 21 Policy Alignment Series: Align New Policies with Existing Efforts to Collaborate

Over the years, policies requiring the creation of a new collaboration that focuses on a narrow topic have left many states and communities with dozens of separate, concurrent collaborations.  As one local leader put it: "I used to have to attend meetings with 17 different departments; now I have to participate in 17 different coalitions."  Georgia, for example, met a federal Head Start requirement regarding early childhood issues by modifying its existing children’s cabinet rather than creating a new collaborative.

Thursday, August 4, 2011
Short Description: 
This policy brief by the Forum for Youth Investment provides real world examples of what can go wrong when policy language does not encourage new efforts to blend with existing collaboratives. The brief also includes examples of language that does promote collaboration.

Don’t Stop Collaborating – Just Stop Creating New Collaboratives

Check out these tips for working collaboratively without creating redundancy. Learn how states and communities, from Petaluma, Calif. to Texas, are taking steps to align their collaboratives.

 

Thursday, August 4, 2011
Short Description: 
Many states and communities have multiple task forces, partnerships and councils working on overlapping youth issues, from bullying to pregnancy to dropouts. This policy brief calls attentions to the problem of collaboration overload, and suggests ways to tackle it.
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